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Curiouser and Curiouser: A Mad Tea Party

Chapter 7

There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. “Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse,” thought Alice; “only, as it’s asleep, I suppose it doesn’t mind.”

The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: “No room! No room!” they cried out when they saw Alice coming. “There’s plenty of room!” said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large armchair at one end of the table. The table was stacked with plates and dishes, teapots and jugs, intricately painted. Some were worn as though they were centuries old.

“Have some tea,” the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.
Alice looked around the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. Her teacup had little playing cards painted on the inside and intricate writing around the rim “I don’t see any tea,” she remarked.
“There isn’t any,” said the March Hare.
“Then it wasn’t very civil of you to offer it,” said Alice angrily.
“It wasn’t very civil of you to sit down without being invited,” said the March Hare.
“I didn’t know it was your table,” said Alice; “it’s laid for a great many more than three.” The tabletop was made Alice saw of intricate ceramic tiles; each one had a painting of a scene of some sort. Alice was inspecting one particular scene which was made up of people on a frozen lake when the Hatter finally spoke up:
“Minton Hollins and Company, Stoke-Upon-Trent.”
Alice didn’t have any idea what he was talking about. “Excuse me, what do you mean by that?”
“Skating” replied the Hatter “1886.”

He must have been talking about the tiles thought Alice, she continued perusing the table, there was a man ploughing a field, a very busy seaside scene and a group of people with a hay-stacked cart. Alice stopped when she arrived at a strange blue scene, it was a group of naked cherubs surrounding a plant, “Please, could you expla…” she was cut off by the March Hare. “You shouldn’t ask personal questions” he said tersely “it’s very rude.”

Alice thought to argue with him that it wasn’t a personal question, but her eye fell upon the most curious little dish. It was no good for eating off nor did it look practical for a tea party in any way, it was a mossy stone shaped dish upon which sat two ceramic lizards. It made Alice think of Bill.

“I want a clean cup,” yelled the Hatter, interrupting Alice’s daydream: “let’s all move one place on.”

He moved one seat over as he spoke, the March Hare moved one over, and Alice rather unwillingly took the place of the March Hare. The Hatter was the only one who got any advantage from the change: and Alice was a good deal worse off than before, as the March Hare had just upset the milk-jug into his plate. The milk-jug itself was shaped like a cow, only it was a vibrant shade of pink. The milk glugged out until the plate was full.
“The Keiller Collection” said the March Hare “Guess how many there are?”
“you’re asking me?” questioned Alice, very much confused, “I don’t think—”
“Then you shouldn’t talk,” said the Hatter.

This piece of rudeness was more than Alice could bear, she got up in great disgust, and walked off. Neither the Hatter nor the March Hare took the least notice of her going, though she looked back once or twice, half hoping that they would call after her. The last time she looked back, they were trying to put a dormouse into a cauliflower teapot.

“At any rate I’ll never go there again!” said Alice as she picked her way through the wood. “It’s the stupidest tea-party I was ever at in all my life!”

She started when she spotted a great bird, it was blue and green and seemed to have eyes in its feathers. Alice crept closer so as not to frighten the poor thing, when she realised this too was ceramic. She was beginning to wonder who could have possibly made the bird and left it out in the wood when she spotted another ceramic bird, this time an owl. It seemed to be a flask of some description, with an empty, detachable head for a cup and Alice presumed it had been misplaced by a member of the tea party.

It was only then Alice noticed the tree behind the owl had a door leading right into it. “That’s very curious!” she thought. “But everything’s curious today. I think I may as well go in at once.” And in she went.

Once more she found herself in the long hall, and close to the little glass table. “Now, I’ll manage better this time,” she said to herself, and began by taking the little golden key, and unlocking the door that led into the garden. Then she went to work nibbling at the mushroom (having kept a piece of it in her pocket) till she was about a foot high: she walked down the little passage and she found herself at last in the beautiful garden.

Chapter 8 coming soon…


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Discover and Play

Chapter 7 Featured Object:

Top Hat

…the last time she saw them, they were trying to put the Dormouse into the teapot. `At any rate I’ll never go THERE again!’ said Alice as she picked her way through the wood. `It’s the stupidest tea-party I ever was at in all my life!’

The theme of madness in Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is illustrated by the strange behaviour of the Mad Hatter and the March Hare.
The phrase “mad as a hatter” is associated with the hat-making industry of the 19th century . A mercury solution was commonly used during the process of turning fur into a felt covering for hats causing the hatters to breathe in the fumes of this highly toxic metal. Over time the build-up of mercury in the workers’ bodies would result in symptoms such as trembling, loss of co-ordination and slurred speech. It is thought that Lewis Carroll’s character of the Mad Hatter could have been inspired by the example of the hat-makers’ exposure to mercury.
To be as “mad as a March hare” refers to the excitable behaviour of hares during the month of March – their breeding season – which includes boxing at other hares and jumping vertically for no apparent reason.

Chapter 7 Blogs, games and activities:

Mad March Hares

Mad March Hares

Find out about the curious activity of hares in spring time

Curiouser and Curiouser: The Pool of Tears

Chapter 2

Walking down the hall, led by even more paintings, Alice entered a room with glass cases everywhere. They were filled with all kinds of trinkets and curiosities. There were fans, bonnets, and an extravagant dress her sister would have fawned over for hours.  

Before she had chance to go further, she heard a little pattering of feet in the distance and turned to see what was coming. It was the White Rabbit, splendidly dressed, with a pair of white kid gloves in one hand and a large fan in the other, muttering under his breath as he went. “Oh! The Duchess, the Duchess! Oh! Won’t she be savage if I’ve kept her waiting!”

When the Rabbit came near enough, Alice decided to ask for his help. “If you please, sir–” The Rabbit jumped violently, dropped the gloves and the fan, and scurried away into the darkness as hard as he could go.

Alice took up the fan and gloves, the former of which came in very handy, as the hall was very hot, so she kept fanning herself. It was very rude of the Rabbit to run away!

Pursuing the rabbit, Alice continued through the room. Each case was more intriguing than the last. Clay shells. A strange pig-like creature. Giant chestnuts! She stopped when she saw the case that contained a doll’s house; it was full of rooms, beautifully decorated and a small family were seated together. Alice wondered what her family would do this evening if she didn’t make it home, thinking of suppertime also made her hungry. She reached into her pocket, ignoring the signs of ‘NO FOOD OR DRINK’ scattered along the walls, and hastily stuffed the small cake into her mouth.

As she approached a statue of a small child, Alice began to feel odd. Looking down, she also noticed that the fan in her hand was becoming bigger. Or maybe she was getting smaller? The thought of which upset her. Alice began to cry, not noticing the pool of tears forming around her feet – nor did Alice notice that with every tear shed, she was beginning to get smaller and smaller, until all at once, she was small enough to be swept up by the river of tears and carried away.

All kinds of unusual objects floated past Alice in the river of tears, she gasped out loud when porcelain creatures that had multiple heads and human features passed her by. She was so caught up in the magical beings that she didn’t notice the mouse until he had already passed her by. She called out to him hoping he could help: “Mouse, do you know the way out of this pool? I am very tired of swimming about here”. The mouse sniffed but said nothing. “If only I hadn’t gotten so upset about my cat Dinah” the mouse leapt out of the water with fright and Alice realized her mistake as he went.

“Mouse, dear! Come back! And we won’t talk about cats if you don’t like them!”

The mouse thought for a second and replied, “Let us get to the shore, and then I’ll tell you my history, and you’ll understand why I hate cats and dogs.”

Along the way, they gathered many other animals that had been caught in the stream of Alice’s tears. There was a Duck and a Dodo, a Lory and an Eaglet, and several other creatures.

“Curiouser and curiouser!” exclaimed Alice as they all climbed out of the river. The Mouse, who seemed to be a person of authority among them, called out:

“Sit down, all of you, and listen to me!”

They all sat down at once, in a large ring, with the Mouse in the middle. But everybody was awfully wet and not at all ready for a story. It was decided they would have a Caucus race to get themselves dry.


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Discover and Play

Chapter 2 Featured Objects:

Folding Fan
1880-1900
J. Duvelleroy, London
white satin with wooden sticks

The Rabbit started violently, dropped the white kid gloves and the fan, and skurried away into the darkness as hard as he could go. Alice took up the fan and gloves, and, as the hall was very hot, she kept fanning herself all the time she went on talking: `Dear, dear! How queer everything is to-day!

The history of the fan stretches back at least 3,000 years. The folding type of fan dropped by the White Rabbit was originally developed in China and Japan. From the 17th century onwards, folding fans were exported in large numbers to Europe, where they became an important fashion accessory. Often highly decorative and made of silk, lace, feathers or wood, fans followed the fashion trends of the day. Painting and decorating your own fan was very popular in the late 19th century and plain white fans such as this example were sold by famous firms such as Duvelleroy for this purpose

Chapter 1 Blogs, games and activities:

Talking Treasures: New Hall Tea Service

Join Miranda Goody, our Senior Curator of Ceramics, for the fifth in our series of Talking Treasures films – New Hall Tea Service.

Gentleman’s Afternoon Tea

It’s not just Mum’s who can enjoy an Afternoon Tea. Here we bring you some ideas for a ‘Gentlemen’s Afternoon Tea’ you can treat your loved ones to this Father’s Day.

You just need to replace the dainty finger sandwiches and cupcakes for a ‘heartier’ selection of delights including cheese, pork pie and pickles.

Why not go for a Staffordshire flavour with cheese from Cheddleton, Branston Pickle (first made in Burton, Staffordshire), Arnold Bennett Omelette, Clay Suzettes (Oatcakes) and Staffordshire Yeoman Pudding.

Round it all off with a local beverage of Titanic Plumporter or Spitfire beer!

Arnold Bennett Omelette Recipe

Staffordshire Yeomanry Pudding Recipe

Curiouser and Curiouser: Pig and Pepper

Chapter 6

For a minute or two she stood looking at the house, and wondering what to do next, when suddenly a footman in livery came running out of the wood, with the face of a fish and rapped loudly at the door with his knuckles. It was opened by another footman in livery, with a round face, and large eyes like a frog; and both footmen, Alice noticed, had powdered hair that curled all over their heads. She was curious to know what was going on and crept a little way out of the wood to listen.

The Fish-Footman began by producing from under his arm a great letter, nearly as large as himself, and this he handed over to the other, saying, in a solemn tone, ‘For the Duchess. An invitation from the Queen to play croquet.’ The Frog-Footman repeated, in the same solemn tone, only changing the order of the words a little, ‘From the Queen. An invitation for the Duchess to play croquet.’

Then they both bowed low, and their curls got entangled together. Alice laughed so loud that she had to take some steps backwards into the forest to keep them from hearing her; and when she next peeped out the Fish-Footman was gone, and the other was sitting on the ground near the door, staring up into the sky. Alice went up to the door and knocked.

‘There’s no sort of use in knocking,’ said the Footman, ‘for two reasons. First, because I’m on the same side of the door as you are; Second, because they’re making such a noise inside, no one could possibly hear you.’

From inside Alice could hear a wild howling, sneezing and occasionally huge crashes of things being broken. ‘Please, then,’ said Alice, ‘how am I to get in?’

‘ARE you to get in at all?’ said the Footman.

At this Alice decided she had had enough of the puzzling remarks from the creatures she had met today and so she opened the door and went in.

The walls were a vibrant lemon yellow but Alice could barely see them as the room was so full of smoke. The Duchess was sitting at a small wooden table, nursing a bundle. Standing at the stove, under a rack of washing suspended from the ceiling, the cook tentatively stirred a concoction which Alice presumed was soup. Leaning over the pot to get a better look Alice began to sneeze terribly.

There’s certainly too much pepper in that soup!’ Alice said to herself, as well as she could for sneezing. There was definitely too much of it in the air. Even the Duchess sneezed occasionally; and as for the baby, it was sneezing and howling alternately without a moment’s pause. The only things in the kitchen that did not sneeze, were the cook, and a large cat which was sitting on the hearth and grinning from ear to ear.

‘Please would you tell me,’ said Alice, ‘why your cat grins like that?’

‘It’s a Cheshire cat,’ said the Duchess, ‘and that’s why. Pig!’ She said the last word with such sudden violence that Alice quite jumped; but she saw in another moment that it was addressed to the baby.

‘Here! you may nurse it a bit, if you like!’ the Duchess said to Alice, flinging the baby at her as she spoke. `I must go and get ready to play croquet with the Queen,’ and she hurried out of the room. The cook threw a frying-pan after her as she went out, but it just missed her. Alice caught the baby with some difficulty, as it was a queer-shaped little creature, and held out its arms and legs in all directions, `just like a star-fish,’ thought Alice. The poor little thing was snorting like a steam-engine when she caught it and kept doubling itself up and straightening itself out again. Alice struggled to contain the child but after a minute or so had figured out a suitable position and set about walking it through the house in an attempt to settle him.

She started upon entering the next room, it was as if she had walked into a completely different building entirely. Strange alcoves ran along both sides – to her left was what looked like a tiled kitchen behind a wooden counter – ‘H NUTTALL MAKER ROCHDALE’ was written upon one of the tiles. To her right was something even more curious – a large cart, brightly coloured with reds, blues and yellows with the elaborately painted sign ‘ROAST POTATOES’.

The baby grunted and Alice looked very anxiously into its face to see what was the matter with it. There could be no doubt that it had a VERY turned-up nose, much more like a snout than a real nose; also its eyes were getting extremely small for a baby: altogether Alice did not like the look of the thing at all. Alice was just beginning to think to herself, ‘Now, what am I to do with this creature when I get it home?’ when it grunted again, so violently, that she looked down into its face in some alarm. This time there could be NO mistake about it: it was neither more nor less than a pig, and she felt that it would be quite absurd for her to carry it further. She placed the pig-baby on the tiled floor by the roast potato cart and walked towards the door. ‘If it had grown up,’ she said to herself, ‘it would have made a dreadfully ugly child: but it makes rather a handsome pig, I think.’

And she began thinking over other children she knew, who might do very well as pigs, she was a little startled by seeing the Cheshire Cat sitting on a bough of a tree a few yards off. The Cat only grinned when it saw Alice. It looked good- natured, she thought, still it had VERY long claws and a great many teeth, so she felt that it ought to be treated with respect.

“Cheshire Puss,” she began, rather timidly, “Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?”

“That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,” said the Cat.

“What sort of people live about here?”

“In THAT direction,” the Cat said, waving its right paw round, “lives a Hatter: and in THAT direction,” waving the other paw, “lives a March Hare. Visit either you like: they’re both mad.”  “But I don’t want to go among mad people,” Alice remarked.

“Oh, you can’t help that,” said the Cat: “we’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad.”

“How do you know I’m mad?” said Alice.

“You must be,”said the Cat, “or you wouldn’t have come here.

“will you play croquet with the Queen to-day?”

“I should like it very much,” said Alice, “but I haven’t been invited yet.”

“You’ll see me there,” said the Cat, vanishing quite slowly, beginning with the end of the tail, and ending with the grin, which remained sometime after the rest of it had gone.

She had not gone much farther before she came in sight of the house of the March Hare: she thought it must be the right house, because the chimneys were shaped like ears and the roof was thatched with fur. She walked up towards it rather timidly, saying to herself “Suppose it should be raving mad after all! I almost wish I’d gone to see the Hatter instead. “

Chapter 7 coming soon…


Continue the Story


Discover and Play

Chapter 6 Featured Object:

Cat Dish
Earthenware dish painted with a cheerful cat
Made by Andrew McGarva, Ross-on-Wye, Herefordshire

I wish you wouldn’t keep appearing and vanishing so suddenly: you make one quite giddy.”

“All right,” said the Cat; and this time it vanished quite slowly, beginning with the end of the tail, and ending with the grin, which remained some time after the rest of it had gone.

“Well! I’ve often seen a cat without a grin,” thought Alice; “but a grin without a cat! It’s the most curious thing I ever saw in my life!”

The Cheshire Cat with its disconcerting grin is one of the most memorable characters in the book, not least for its remarkable habit of appearing and disappearing. However, the phrase “to grin like a Cheshire cat” was in popular use at least eighty years before Carroll used it, appearing in A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue published in 1788. As for the meaning of the phrase, opinion is divided with many fanciful suggestions.

Covid Accessibility Guide

At The Potteries Museum & Art Gallery we have the Government guidelines in place to keep our visitors and staff safe during the pandemic. These guidelines include: a one-way system shown by directional red footprints on the floor, hand sanitising stations and maintaining the 2-metre distance rule between visitors.

The Museum has introduced timed entry slots to monitor the flow of visitors, which will need to be pre-booked by calling 01782 232323.

To keep with government guidelines all visitors must be part of the same household/bubble.

The Potteries Museum & Art Gallery is also part of the VisitBritain’s ‘We’re Good To Go’ scheme.  

As you first arrive at the museum you will be asked to sanitise your hands and to wear a face mask, unless exempted, before entering the galleries.

We will also be asking for Track and Trace details to be left with a member or staff or via the NHS app.

The Museum has in place regular cleaning of the toilets and touch points.

In line with the government guidelines our temporary café will be running table service as well as providing socially distanced seating.   

The Museum has provided many sanitising stations throughout all of the floors for visitors to use.

We have visual footprints to guide visitors around the museum following the one-way system.

During this time our touchable interactive exhibits have been removed however, we have made a family pack available to purchase from the reception area.

Due to the Covid-19 Pandemic, you will be unable to touch shop items unless you will be purchasing them. This will help to reduce the risk of spreading any germs.

We look forward to welcoming all our visitors back to the museum with the safest measures in place.

We have a very friendly front of house team who are happy to answer any questions and provide information during you visit.

Museum Visitor Assistants

Accessibility Guide

[Download this page as a PDF]

At The Potteries Museum & Art Gallery we have the Government guidelines in place to keep our visitors and staff safe during the pandemic – Find out more here.

The Potteries Museum & Art Gallery is fully wheelchair and push chair accessible, as we are a step-free site.

Nearest parking can be found using Google Maps [External Link]


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During the building works for the Spitfire Gallery we recommend blue badge holders use spaces in Albion Street (ST1 1QF), where there is a disabled bay and on-street bays which are free to badge holders. There are also bays in Bethesda Street (ST1 3BP).

The Museum is sectioned into 3 floor levels. You can view a floorplan of the Museum here [PDF]

Guide Dogs Welcome

Manual wheelchairs are available on request which visitors may borrow during their visit. Please note that due to current government guidelines this option may not be available.

The Museum supports and accepts all guide dogs with water bowls available from the café on request.

The main entrance is located on ground floor which leads to The Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Mercia Gallery following through to Natural Science, Archaeology and Local History Galleries.

The Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Mercia Gallery, which contains the Staffordshire Hoard, has a small stage area with seating and a display fire pit. This can be accessed via an accessible ramp.  

Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Mercia Ramp Access

The Ceramics Gallery, Design Gallery and Art Gallery are located on the first floor which can be accessed via wheelchair/pushchair friendly elevator that is found on the right-hand side of the foyer next to the stairs. (Dimensions of elevator-H200cm W79cm)

Hearing Loop available

The Café and School Space are located on the lower ground floor which is also accessible via the same elevator.

Our temporary Café is located on the ground floor. (Dimensions of counter- H91cm)

The Museum’s reception area has a fully function hearing loop as well as the theatre when in use.

All three floors have automated doors as well as adequate seating right the way through. (Dimensions of automated doors- H199cm W130cm)   

Baby changing facilities are available inside the Museum on both the ground and lower ground floors.

The nearest Changing Places toilet is at Hanley Bus Station. These are fully accessible toilets designed with generous space and equipment.

Accessible toilets can be found on both the ground floor and lower ground floor. The toilets require a radar key however; the Museum also has a set of radar keys that can be used in emergencies.

Radar Key required

We have a very friendly front of house team who are happy to answer any questions and provide information.

Museum Visitor Assistants

If you are looking for a quieter time to visit the Museum we suggest a term time weekday or Sunday afternoon. Please feel free to call the Museum on the day of your visit where we can update you on how busy the Museum is and if we have any coach parties or school groups visiting.

Red-necked Wallaby

At the Museum our Natural Science Gallery is also a sensory gallery. An immersive soundscape flows through the Gallery, bringing our Moorland, Woodland and Wetland areas to life with the sounds of rustling leaves, babbling water and birdsong. There are games and activities for children to play and even the chance to find out what a fox smells like!

As well as areas within the galleries, we have a Secret Garden where visitors can sit and enjoy the garden space which includes locally crafted works of art.

Secret Garden

If you would like to familiarise yourself before a visit to the Museum have a look at our Virtual Gallery Tour.

Here are some visual images of the Museum to familiarise yourself with before your visit.

Curiouser and Curiouser: The Caucus-Race

Chapter 3

“But what IS a Caucus-race, exactly?” asked Alice.

“Well, I think the best way to explain what a Caucus-race is, is to have a Caucus-race!” said the Dodo, already marking out a racecourse in a sort of circle. There was no: ‘ready, set, go!’. Instead, they ran whenever they liked, and left off when they liked, so it was not very easy to know when the race was over.

However, after running for half an hour or so, when everyone was dry again, the Dodo called out: “The race is over!” and all the creatures crowded around it, panting and asking: “But who has won?”
“EVERYBODY has won!” the dodo said, “and all must have prizes!”

Prizes?! All Alice could think to do was put a hand into her pocket, pull out a bag of comfits, and began handing them out. There was one each for everyone, except for Alice herself.

“But she must have a prize herself, you know!” said the Mouse.

“Of course,” the Dodo replied, very gravely indeed. “What else have you got in your pocket?”
Only a thimble,” said Alice, sadly.
“Hand it to me,” said the Dodo. They all crowded around her once more, while the Dodo presented the thimble. “We beg your acceptance of this elegant thimble.”

Alice thought the whole thing to be very absurd; and being unable to conjure any words, she simply bowed and took the thimble. They found some comfy chairs and sat down again next to the ghost child, back in the now tear-less case room, and begged the mouse to tell them more stories.

“You promised to tell me your history,” Alice enquired, “you know, why it is you hate C and D?”

The mouse, clearing his throat, began to talk of all sorts of non-sensical things. Alice soon found her thoughts drifting away, thinking instead of Dinah, which lead her to say aloud, to nobody in particular: “I wish I had our Dinah here, I know I do!”

“And who is Dinah, if I might venture to ask the question?” said the Lory.
“Dinah’s our cat!” Alice replied eagerly, excited to talk about her pet. “And she’s so good at catching mice you can’t think! And oh, if you could see her after the birds! Why, she’ll eat a little bird as soon as look at it!”

Alice’s words caused a remarkable sensation among the party. Some of the birds hurried off at once. The old Magpie began wrapping itself up, while a Canary pulled its children away to bed. One after another the creatures left and Alice was alone. Here she began to cry again, for she felt very lonely and low-spirited. After a while, however, she heard a familiar pattering of footsteps in the distance. Eagerly, she looked up…


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Chapter 3 Featured Objects:

Canary

When Alice cries a large pool of tears, she falls into the water along with birds, and other animals. Alice leads them to shore but soon upsets the party by fondly recalling the activities of her family cat.

Dinah’s our cat. And she’s such a capital one for catching mice you can’t think! And oh, I wish you could see her after the birds! Why, she’ll eat a little bird as soon as look at it!

This speech caused a remarkable sensation among the party. Some of the birds hurried off at once … a Canary called out in a trembling voice to its children, “Come away, my dears! It’s high time you were all in bed!” On various pretexts they all moved off, and Alice was soon left alone.

The real danger to the canaries used in this cage came not from cats, but from dangerous underground gases. Before electronic sensors where introduced, miners would carry a canary in a small cage. The birds were particularly sensitive to toxic gases such as carbon monoxide which is colourless, odourless and tasteless. Any sign of distress from the canary was a clear sign that the conditions were unsafe and that miners should be evacuated.

Chapter 3 Blogs, games and activities:

Exhibition1

Filler Text to give move volume to exhibition to view

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Box 1

Box 1

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Box 2

Box 2

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Rodin, Auguste; Eternal Spring; The Potteries Museum & Art Gallery; http://www.artuk.org/artworks/eternal-spring-268831

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Clay Bowl

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Jesus Figurine

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Easter Sale

Great savings on these Easter gift ideas from Monday 15 March until 11 April

TY plush toys – 20% off these marked prices

Moorland Pottery Mugs – 20% off these marked prices

Black Star Ceramics – 20% off these marked prices

Carole Glover Owls and Birds – 20% off these marked prices

6 Towns Local History Books – 20% off these marked prices

Wrendale Gardening Range – 30% off these marked prices

Tea Light Selection. 20% off these marked prices